Autumn Reads: I Recommend Thrillers

August 25, 2018

I hope the title is pretty self-explanatory. I’m in the progress of putting together a long list of books that suits the weather, colors or mood of Autumn, which is right around the corner. I will feature multiple genres and a big age interval so there’s a good chance of being inspired – even if you’re picky with titles or a mood reader like me. Since I have a lot of books to recommend to you guys this will be a mini series, meaning, I will upload a new list every week featuring a new genre. I’ll try not to add too many epic titles such as Harry Potter, Lord of the Rings etc.. since these iconic stories might also be well-suited for Autumn reads but you probably already know them and I would rather bring you new titles. I’m also keeping the book info short to 1) not make these posts insanely long and 2) not give away too much of the story. Now go get inspired!

THRILLERS

Starting off with the genre that fits the rain and falling leafs so well. I love a good thriller when it’s getting dark and cold outside, it simply takes the atmosphere and suspense to the next level. All you need is a cup of tea or coffee and a blanket to keep you warm against the shivers running down your spine when you read these books:

The Girl on the Train by Paula Hawkins

Rachel catches the same commuter train every morning. She knows it will wait at the same signal each time, overlooking a row of back gardens. She’s even started to feel like she knows the people who live in one of the houses. ‘Jess and Jason’, she calls them. Their life – as she knows it – is perfect. Until one day when Rachel sees something terrible and becomes involved with the investigation of “Jess and Jason”. Meanwhile, Rachel’s drinking is causing trouble and she cannot get her ex-husband out of her head.

Tags: murder, suspense, multiple POVs

The Lying game by Ruth Ware

Four girls were best friends at Salten, a second rate boarding school. They became notorious for playing the Lying Game, telling lies at every turn to fellow boarders and faculty, with varying states of disturbing nature so everyone steered clear of them. Rules of the game are strict: no lying to each other and bail on the lie when it is about to be found out. But their little game had consequences, and the girls were all expelled under mysterious circumstances surrounding the death of the school’s eccentric art teacher.

Tags: girl clique, crime, lying, intrigue

The Murder of Roger Ackroyd by Agatha Christie

In the village of King’s Abbot, a widow’s sudden suicide sparks rumors that she murdered her first husband, was being blackmailed, and was carrying on a secret affair with the wealthy Roger Ackroyd. The following evening, Ackroyd is murdered in his locked study -but not before receiving a letter identifying the widow’s blackmailer. King’s Abbot is crawling with suspects and it is now up to the famous detective Hercule Poirot, who has retired to King’s Abbot, to solve the case of who killed Roger Ackroyd.

Tags: classic crime, murder, village life, cozy

Our House by Louise Candlish

When Fiona Lawson comes home to find strangers moving into her house, she’s sure there’s been a mistake. She and her estranged husband, Bram, have a modern co-parenting arrangement: bird’s nest custody, where each parent spends a few nights a week with their two sons at the prized family home to maintain stability for their children. Now Bram has disappeared and so have Fiona’s children. As events spiral well beyond her control, Fiona will discover just how many lies her husband was weaving and how little they truly knew each other.

Tags: mystery, intrigue, lies, family

The Woman in the Window by A.J. Finn

Anna Fox lives alone in New York. She spends her day drinking wine (maybe too much), watching old movies, recalling happier times and spying on her neighbors. Then the Russells move into the house across the way: a father, a mother, their teenage son. The perfect family. But when Anna, gazing out her window one night, sees something she shouldn’t, her world begins to crumble. What is real? What is imagined? Who is in danger?

Tags: crime, suspense, mental health, spying

The Girl with the Dragon Tattoo by Stieg Larsson

Mikael Blomkvist, a journalist is hired to get to the bottom of Harriet Vanger’s disappearance with the help of Lisbeth Salander, a 24 year-old pierced and tattooed genius hacker with a terrifying capacity for ruthlessness. This unlikely team discovers a trail of nearly unfathomable elements running through the Vanger family and astonishing corruption in the highest circles of Swedish industrialism.

Tags: Swedish crime, investigation, violence

Strangers on a Bridge by James B. Donovan

This is the story of the insider account of the Cold War spy exchange that is now the subject of the major motion picture Bridge of Spies by Steven Spielberg starring Tom Hanks. No one was better equipped to tell the whole absorbing history than James B. Donovan, who was appointed to defend one of his country’s enemies and did so with scrupulous skill.

Tags: historical, spies, heavy, very interesting

Sharp Objects by Gillian Flynn

Reporter Camille Preaker faces a troubling assignment: she must return to her hometown to cover the murders of two preteen girls. For years, Camille has hardly spoken to her neurotic, hypochondriac mother or to the half-sister she barely knows. Now, installed in her old bedroom in her family’s Victorian mansion, Camille finds herself identifying with the young victims—a bit too strongly.

Tags: murder, psychological, intense, creepy

 

I hope you got some inspiration for your next read. If you have already read one or more of these titles, let me know what you thought of them. Also, what’s your recommendation for a good Autumn thriller read? Let me know in a comment below!

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